Latest education news for schools across the globe

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Education
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Resilience in education catering – how the industry bounced back

Over the past two years, the Coronavirus pandemic has caused widespread chaos and disruption across the country, perhaps most notably to children and staff in education.  

 

Since March 2020, UK children have spent months in and out of local and national lockdowns. These disruptions resulted in an unprecedented amount of time missed from the classroom and a nationwide appeal to increase the standards of home food parcels for free school meal kids who missed out on their regular hot and healthy meals usually served from the canteen.  

 

Despite the hardships and challenges that everyone in education catering has faced, it’s been brilliant to see how the industry has bounced back since reopening. 

 

Food Parcels and School Responses

In January of this year, one mother took to Twitter to express her shock over the quality of a food parcel she had received. The image shared 15,000 times on social media sparked a considerable discussion across the UK about the quantity and quality of food distributed to children's homes claiming free school meal provision.  

 

In response to the criticism, some schoolteachers and caterers began stepping in to help struggling children and parents from their own pockets, showing the incredible kindness of those working in education.  

 

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One school staff member, Zane Powels, donated 7,500 meals in total alongside laptops to assist vulnerable children whilst they were learning at home. The hero from Western Primary School in Grimsby was given an MBE for his extraordinary efforts, delivering 138 meals a day to children - walking a total of 550 miles during last year’s first lockdown. 

 

Another team of school caterers from Thomas Deacon Education Trust in Peterborough also pulled together to deliver 600 meal parcels over four weeks. Catering Operations Manager for TDET, Michael Dove, said: “It has been an honour to support our local community throughout this pandemic. We understand that food plays an important role in enabling our pupils to achieve their very best. For some children, the meal they would usually have at school would be their only hot meal of the day, and we must continue to provide this for them in the best way we can.”  

 

This collective effort of school caterers led to a nationwide review of the school meal packages, prompting change and helping to protect vulnerable children at a time when they needed it most. 

 

Reopening School Kitchens

When schools returned, the standard lunch service had changed completely. New social distancing measures were in place, and more schools started to implement pre-ordering solutions to allow for a safer and simpler grab-and-go system. 

 

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Not only could thousands of vital school caterers return to working at full capacity, but the pause from ordinary operations has allowed the industry to revaluate its approaches towards sustainability and food waste.  

 

A report produced by Footprint Intelligence which focused on conquering challenges in education catering during COVID-19, discovered that 75% of foodservice professionals believed that sustainability had been side-lined because of the pandemic. A further 96% reported that COVID-19 had increased the use of disposables. But there is hope! The same people noted that other solutions are proven to work, including existing crockery and reusable options such as bento boxes and how there was now the momentum to change a broken system. 

 

The report concluded that with the learnings of the pandemic considered, there is no better time than now to begin future-proofing the school lunch service for the benefit of the planet. Whether it be through trailing a plant-based menu, implementing pre-ordering solutions, or pushing for policy changes, the resilience from the education catering industry throughout these challenging times has meant that it now can bounce back better than ever before.  

 

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Celebrating the education catering industry

Finally, it’s been a challenging year, so celebrating the work of the industry is paramount. With awards such as The LACA Awards For Excellence and the Public Sector Catering Awards on the calendar, these events will allow us to celebrate the unsung heroes of the pandemic and push the industry to even greater heights as it bounces back to its former glory. 

 

We can’t wait to see what happens next. 

 

Get started

 

To learn more about pre-ordering solutions for your school, get in touch to arrange a free demonstration of Infinity+ Order.

Education
pupils-eating-lunch-in-school-canteen
How to encourage healthy eating in schools

When presented with a slice of pizza or a salad, most pupils will likely choose the pizza. The fast, greasy, and fried option will ultimately appeal to many students.

 

When faced with this reality, combined with the ever-increasing accessibility of fast, takeaway foods from outlets such as Deliveroo and JustEat, schools and parents face increasing challenges to get pupils to make healthier eating choices in schools. At ami Education, we are looking at practical and straightforward ways to encourage healthy eating in schools and the impact on pupils.

Emphasise nutrition education

Many of us understand how the food we eat impacts our everyday life, including our concentration levels, mood, skin, hair, and even sleep. However, some pupils, especially those without an active interest in food and nutrition, risk not understanding the full extent to which the food they put in their bodies affects their life.

 

Schools, parents, and guardians can take an active role in educating pupils about nutrition and the impact of a healthy diet on their ability to learn and their life outside of the classroom.

 

Focusing on how food can make us feel and demonstrating how the choices we make regarding food directly affects the way we behave enables action-based learning, which pupils can apply to their everyday life.

 

For example, demonstrating how switching from white pasta to wholewheat pasta can keep us fuller for longer and reduce the risk of excess snacking and how simple changes can significantly impact and encourage pupils to take an active role in their health.

Food labels and online resources

Nutrition and allergen information on food labels is mandatory. With Natasha’s Law soon to come into effect, which will require all food businesses, including school caterers, to include accurate and in-depth ingredient lists on food labels, pupils must learn what this information means to them.

 

Nutrition information can help us make informed food choices. Educating pupils on reading and processing food labels is crucial, especially if we want pupils to carry healthy eating habits into adulthood.

 

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Teachers can provide worksheets for pupils to fill in and compare food labels from different products in the classroom. Food A Fact Of Life, managed by the British Nutrition Foundation, which provides free educational resources for nutrition education, suggests providing pupils with clean packaging from a range of standard and healthy food options.

 

The pupils can read and compare food labels and discuss the findings with their classmates, such as the first ingredient listed in each product, compare the sugar and fat contents, and why some products are more likely to contain higher amounts of sugars than others. 

 

Online resources are not only available to schools but also parents and guardians. Websites such as Change4Life, launched in 2009 as part of a national goal set out in the government’s Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives initiative, is designed to ensure parents and guardians have the essential support and tools they need to make healthier choices for their family.

 

Change4Life provides fun activities, recipes, and a range of food facts to help educate families on nutrition and provide a fun and interactive way for children to learn about a healthy lifestyle. Visit the Change4Life website to access these resources.

 

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School dinners vs packed lunches

Whilst school catering teams strive to provide nutritious and tasty lunches to help power pupils through the day, the prevalence of packed lunches is a challenge for schools aiming to meet strict nutritional standards.

 

There is currently no government guidance on packed school lunches in UK schools. Whilst individual schools in England can decide their policy on food brought in from home, compared with hot school meals required to meet strict nutritional standards, packed lunches face fewer restrictions and increase the likelihood of unhealthy food brought in.

 

Research conducted by the Children’s Food Trust in 2013 compared hot school meals against packed lunches following new compulsory school food standards. The research found that school meals are now consistently more nutritious than packed lunches, giving children who eat them a better foundation for good health.

 

For pupils of all ages, opting for hot school lunches where possible ensure their lunch choices will contain:

  • High-quality meat, poultry or oily fish
  • Fruit and vegetables
  • Bread, other cereals and potatoes

Parents and pupils can also rest assured that restrictions for hot school meals apply to:

  • Drinks with added sugar, crisps, chocolate, or sweets
  • Limits of no more than two portions of deep-fried, battered, or breaded food a week
 

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Offer a familiar ordering experience for pupils

Technology plays a significant part in our everyday lives, especially secondary school students. With easily accessible food delivery apps like Uber Eats and Deliveroo on every mobile phone, it has never been easier to provide a solution that competes with these out-of-the-gate spending options and encourage pupils back in the dining hall.

 

Technology like ami’s Infinity+ Order app breaks the confines of the school dining hall and enables pupils to pre-order their school meals directly from their mobile phone, anytime, anywhere. Infinity+ Order offers secondary school pupils a familiar food ordering method whilst providing a host of other benefits to pupils and school staff, including:

  • Reduced lunch queues - pupils pre-order their meals ready to collect at lunchtime
  • Pupils can view their live cashless balance and previous transaction history anytime, anywhere
  • Helps reduce food wastage by informing school catering teams of what to prepare in advance
  • Reporting suite assists with stock control and trend predictions
 

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From ground to fork

An increasing number of UK schools are now dedicating school ground spaces to growing fresh fruit and vegetables to serve in the school dining hall.

 

This new teaching method encourages pupils to make healthy eating choices in school by involving them in where their food comes from and teaching about food production outside of the classroom and the overall process from ground to fork.

 

For establishments with ground space to spare, providing areas for pupils to grow fresh fruits and vegetables teaches them to take an active interest in the food they eat.

 

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Teaching pupils the value of growing their food encourages students to opt for lunch choices they grew and provides freshly grown, organic foods that appeal to students.

 

One UK school pioneering the way in growing and rearing its produce is Charlton Manor Primary School, based in South-East London. Its pupils grow figs, oranges, tomatoes, grapes, and kiwis. There are also chickens and three beehives on-site, whilst the school has a campaign team made up of year 5 and 6 pupils to raise awareness about healthy diets.

 

“Charlton is a brilliant example of a school bringing together gardening and healthy eating. With vision and a bit of dedication, any school can get growing." Chris Collins, Head of Organic Horticulture for Garden Organic.

Get started

Encouraging students to make healthy choices in school can often seem like an uphill battle. With these simple tips and a wealth of online resources available for schools and parents, we can all get involved with inspiring the next generation to take control over their health, both inside and outside of the classroom.

 

Interested in learning more about Infinity+ Order? Get in touch to learn more about how pre-ordering can benefit your school.

 

How

Education
Young girls choosing school lunch
7 steps to improving nutrition in schools

The role of schools in forming lifelong healthy eating habits cannot be underestimated. By providing effective nutrition education alongside healthy school meals, schools can equip pupils with the tools to make healthier choices in adolescence and later life.

 

This week marks the British Nutrition Foundation’s Healthy Eating Week, which focuses on the ‘finding your healthier you’ journey. We have compiled seven practical steps to improve nutrition in schools and encourage positive long-term eating habits.

 

What are the government food standards and regulations for schools?

According to gov.uk, food served in schools and academies in England must meet the School Food Standards so that children have healthy, balanced diets.

 

Meals must provide high-quality meat, poultry or oily fish, fruit and vegetables, bread, and other cereals and potatoes. There cannot be drinks with added sugar and crisps, chocolate or sweets in school meals or vending machines, alongside a limit of no more than two portions of deep-fried, battered, or breaded food a week.

 

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Are schools delivering adequate nutrition to staff and pupils?

 

Whilst the School Food Standards are in place to ensure schools encourage pupils to develop healthy food choices; some schools struggle to get the correct nutrition and balanced diet to not only their students but to their staff body, and for various reasons.

 

There are various reasons for this struggle, and one most evident is the lack of efficient management in their school systems.

 

One of the biggest offenders of an unhealthy diet in pupils is the day-to-day slog of mealtime queuing in schools. Long wait times with shorter lunchtimes increase pupils' likelihood of making lunch choices based on convenience and availability.

 

Therefore, mealtime queuing can be one of the main contributors to unhealthy food choices in schools, leading to malnutrition, reduced productivity, and childhood obesity.

 

Out-of-gate spending

 

As pupils turn to alternative methods to queue for school lunches, out-of-gate spending increases further. According to Q Minder, a secondary school in London found that its pupils rejected food in a school canteen and instead favoured the option to leave school grounds and purchase their lunches, rather than queue for the school meals provided.

 

This kind of out-of-gate spending can mean students are consuming unhealthy foods for lunch, which the school cannot have complete control over, increasing the risk of childhood weight gain and poor nutrition in children.

 

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Doctor Dame Sally Davies warns obesity poses such a threat to the country that we should treat it as a national risk alongside terrorism. This statement was accompanied by a survey that found obesity prevalence was 13.9% among 2- to 5-year-olds, 18.4% among 6- to 11-year-olds, and 20.6% among 12- to 19-year-olds. 

 

How can schools teach children about food nutrition and a healthy diet?

 

According to the school blog KSL, there are seven helpful pointers to assist schools with food with pupils healthily and educationally. These include:

 
  1. 1. Be mindful of language - avoid using ‘bad versus good’ language surrounding food choices, which teaches kids to categorise food types based on morality can lead to shame and guilt when indulging in the occasional treat.
  2.  
  3. 2. Teach that food is fuel for the body - encourage children to associate nutritious foods with gaining energy to do all the things they love.
  4.  
  5. 3. Encourage trying new foods - use taste testing, introduce variety and teach pupils about the exciting foods on offer in different countries.
  6.  
  7. 4. Teach the principle of variety - provide education on a balanced meal, and link this back to the enjoyment of food and how nutritious food can also be tasty.
  8.  
  9. 5. Back to nature - connect kids to gardening and agriculture and teach them where foods come from with 'grow your own' activities in lessons.
  10.  
  11. 6. Teach the importance of inclusivity - reinforce the idea that all foods can be included, in moderation, in a balanced diet. Avoid discussing eliminating food groups.
  12.  
  13. 7. Teach kids to respect biological diversity - discuss messages of size diversity in the context of a lesson on nutrition.
 

The link between cashless operations and pupil diets

 

Cashless catering systems, such as AMI's Infinity + software, offer complete flexibility and work around each school's requirements. During school mealtimes, cashless systems reduce queues by using quicker identification methods and pre-order payments. These cashless methods ensure pupils spend less time queuing and have more time to eat a healthy school lunch.

 

The pre-order aspect of this software minimises food wastage whilst providing detailed allergy and dietary requirement information. The app also enables schools to remove any potential discrimination of students by offering Free School Meals (FSM) anonymity.

 

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A LACA survey revealed that 4.9% of pupils entitled to a free school meal do not take up their entitlement, possibly due to parents not wanting their children to face potential embarrassment and discrimination. 

 

A cashless system also promotes healthy eating in schools as it reduces and controls the level of out-of-the-gate spending on unhealthy meals and snacks. Pre-order software, such as the Infinity+ Order pre-order app, mirrors modern food ordering apps such as Deliveroo, which encourages pupils to control their food choices and guarantees they can enjoy their favourite lunch every day.

 

Healthier lunch options that meet nutritional requirements are among the most effective ways to tackle the childhood obesity crisis, leading to a better learning environment and reducing food insecurity by establishing a lifetime of healthy habits in students.

 

Furthermore, AMI’s Infinity + cashless catering and ID management software enables parents to take an active role in their children’s daily school food consumption, despite them not being present at school throughout the day.

 

When using the Infinity+ Order pre-order app, parents can sit with their children and help them make educated and balanced food choices, ensuring their child is getting a healthy and nutritious meal during school hours. The cashless catering options of AMI Education means parents can rest assured the money spent on school meals is used to make healthy food choices backed by a comprehensive education on nutrition in schools.

 

Are you looking to make your school cashless?

Get in touch with our team to see how ami’s cashless solutions can benefit your school.

 

How

ami news, Education
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Product launch! Pre-order app for secondary schools, Infinity+ Order

Pre-order school meals on-the-go

We are delighted to launch our pre-order app, Infinity+ Order, the contactless app that enables pupils to pre-order their school meals in advance directly from their phones.

 

The simple pre-ordering solution is our latest innovation to join our Infinity+ range of cashless identity management and registration software for schools and colleges worldwide.

 

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Contactless meal ordering

The Infinity+ Order app is linked with Infinity+ cashless software to facilitate a contactless lunchtime for pupils to ensure a simple payment and service process.

 

The payment is automatically deducted from their cashless account when pupils order their school meals via the app. This function offers a fully contactless lunch service, and schools are encouraged to control traffic flow with designated pre-order pick-up points.

 

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Head of Operations at ami Education, Tony Reeves, said:

“When COVID-19 forced schools around the world to close, we knew that it was vital to ensure that there was a safe solution in place for pupils to pre-order and collect their lunch when schools reopen. We’re excited to offer schools a simple way to do this with the Infinity+ Order app, which allows pupils to order, pay and collect their lunches with just a few clicks.” 

 

Key features of the pre-order app

With retailers adapting to the COVID-19 crisis by switching to contactless order methods, many schools have implemented similar solutions, with ami’s Infinity+ Order pre-order app offering schools a way to mimic out-of-the-gate spending.

 

Infinity+ Order is designed to improve efficiencies for school catering teams by notifying staff in advance of meals ordered to allow catering teams to prepare food accordingly and reduce food wastage. Key benefits of Infinity+ Order include:

  • Removes the need for cash in the dining hall
  • Completely contactless lunch service
  • Pupils can check their live cashless balance anywhere and anytime
  • Software is linked to the Infinity+ cashless system for a seamlessly integrated pre-order system
  • Pre-order school meals in advance for the date of their choice
  • School catering teams are notified of meals ordered in advance and can prepare quantities of food accordingly, reducing food wastage
  • Pupils and parents can view current and previous orders
 

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What Parents say about Infinity+ Order

Following the app launch, a selection of UK schools implemented Infinity+ Order as part of their cashless catering solutions. When reviewing the app, one parent said:

 

“The app is amazing. My daughter downloaded it and now pre-orders almost every day.” 

- Secondary school parent, Preston

 

 

 

Interested to learn more about Infinity+ Order?


Speak with our friendly team at ami Education. Get in touch to discuss the right software solutions for your education establishment.

 

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Education
Primary school grab and go bag
The need for pre-ordering school meals after lockdown

During the Coronavirus pandemic, innovative technology such as pre-order apps and cashless catering products have come into a league of their own.

 

From improving the flow of traffic within the school dining hall to helping schools to maintain social distancing guidelines by enabling students to use their mobile devices to select their food options anytime, anywhere, pre-order apps such as ami Education’s Infinity+ Order have proved their worth in the past year.

 

However, with so many more untold benefits, it’s clear to say that the peak of school meal pre-ordering is far from over.

 

For

 

Why do we need pre-ordering after lockdown?

 

Outside of the context of COVID-19, pre-ordering technology still holds value. According to a recent Footprint Intelligence Report, 41% of foodservice professionals said schools with pre-ordering systems have reduced food wastage and increased lunchtime efficiencies.

 

Maintaining a streamlined lunchtime service is also vital for reducing the stress of school caterers who have worked tirelessly to provide students with meals during the pandemic. When students select their meals ahead of time, catering teams can produce the exact amount of food required, eradicating the need for over-catering and cutting down on food wastage, which is better for school budgets, catering staff, and the planet.

 

Cutting down on food wastage isn’t the only way pre-ordering is helping schools to reach their sustainability targets. The Infinity+ Order app provides complete records of past orders, and the online payment integration means that receipts no longer need to be printed out at POS, saving paper and needless printing costs.

 

Moreover, the powerful reporting suite helps predict trends that can help with accurate stock control to save schools money and food from ending up in the cafeteria bin.

 

For

 

It’s not just the environmental factors attracting schools towards the pre-ordering revolution. Cashless catering apps such as Infinity+ Order are widely accessible on mainstream download platforms such as the App Store or Google Play, meaning that any student with a smartphone can gain access to the ease of pre-ordering in just a few clicks.

 

This ability to order snacks and meals from a personal device also gives students claiming free school meals added anonymity throughout the ordering and collection process, ensuring that FSM students are comfortable in the dining hall.

 

As schools adapt to the new normal, their primary goal will be to help students who may have fallen behind catch up to where they need to be. Pre-order apps can help with this task by reducing the amount of time spent queuing, meaning that pupils can get back to lunchtime catchup clubs as soon as possible.

 

Ordering meals in advance also removes hunger-based decisions, which often consist of unhealthy snacks and drinks - encouraging pupils to pick a fully nutritious meal that can power them through the day and improve their concentration in class.

 

What’s not to love? Find out more about implementing pre-ordering into your education environment here to access a world of benefits: https://www.amieducation.com/pre-order-app.

 
Education
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International School Meals Day: the importance of nutritious school meals

As International School Meals Day returns for its ninth year running, the awareness day aims to highlight the options for affordable and nutritious meals for schools whilst exploring the links between good food and children's mental and physical health.

 

The theme for 2021 is 'Eat for the Health of it,' which allows children, businesses, and communities to come together and share their thoughts, knowledge, and opinions regarding school meals. We're looking at the importance of nutritious school meals and the effects on a pupil's learning ability.

 

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Why are healthy school meals so important?

Not only are schools required by law to serve nutritious school lunches containing high-quality meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, and bread, but they also provide the fuel for a more productive day of learning for students.

 

Eating a nutritious plate of food at lunchtime is proven to boost the attention span and alertness of pupils in the classroom in comparison to those who consume poor meals in the canteen. A study published by The Atlantic in 2018 discovered that schools that held a contract with healthier school catering services also performed better in state examinations, further boosting the reasoning for school meals to be at the forefront of industry conversation.

 

But school meals are not only crucial for boosting concentration. They are also the primary source of nutrition for students during a critical period of their development, providing the vital calories they need to maintain their physical wellbeing.

 

Conversations on food insecurity, which is on the rise and experienced by 2.3 million children between March and August in 2020 alone (End Child Food Poverty), are now more noteworthy than ever. These conversations have further elevated the importance of getting a nutritious, hot school meal out to children who otherwise may not receive the food they need.

 

Students claiming free school meals are especially vulnerable in this area, so assuring they have access to at least one good meal at school is pivotal to not only their health but to the quality of their education as well.

 

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How can I get involved in International School Meals Day 2021?

There are many ways to participate in the event to suit your organisation or classroom! Here are some suggestions:

  • Have an International Menu Day, featuring food from around the world
  • Run food tasting sessions or hold other fun food-related activities
  • Host cooking activities with an international theme
  • Hold fundraising activities for charities to support school feeding programmes in developing countries
  • Incorporate global citizenship, food culture and healthy eating into classroom learning
  • Run seminars, workshops or events related to food traditions, ceremonies, or celebrations
  • Research and publish information about school foods and the benefits of healthy eating

However, promoting the importance of school meals and continually highlighting their impact on the lives of young people all year round is critical. It helps implement changes to ensure pupils make healthy food choices at mealtimes.

 

Pre-ordering software such as AMI’s Infinity+ Order App are leading the way in encouraging children to eat healthily by removing hunger-based, random selections in the lunch queue, among other benefits which you can read about in our blog.

 

However you decide to celebrate #InternationalSchoolMealsDay, we hope you have a great time! For more information, visit the official ISMD website.

 

How

Education
Catering staff serving food to pupils
How to reduce over-catering in schools

Reducing food wastage and increasing school uptake

 

Over the last three decades, the UK has seen some of the steepest education cuts, making it increasingly difficult for schools to balance their books. One of the most significant potentials for loss is mealtime and food ordering.

 

The introduction of the School Food Plan and universal free school meals means school kitchens are under pressure to provide healthy, nutritious meals within the government set allowance. Therefore, with over-catering being the potential source of profit loss, avoiding producing excess food must be a key consideration for schools.

 

What are the effects of over-catering in schools?

The biggest issue of over-catering in schools is without doubt wastage, both food and money wastage. Menu choices can significantly impact the efficiency of the school’s catering budget. For example, if the school has too many options on the menu and is over-ordering food, many items may have low take-up.

 

Therefore, the school is likely spending money on food ending up in the bin. Streamlining the menu by adopting pre-ordering systems, like ami’s Infinity+ cashless software, including the Infinity+ Order pre-order app, can help reduce food waste and save the school money on the cost of supplies.

 

As pointed out by Birmingham.Gov, catering staff in schools generally have information on the number of pupils they are cooking for, but, in most schools, they have no information about the specific numbers for each meal option. Although they are skilled at estimating how many children will choose each meal, they have no way of knowing the exact numbers, and this lack of information can result in food wastage.

 

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Automating food orders within schools

With a system that allows pre-ordered school meals, children and parents can choose their preferred meal option each day, allowing catering staff to have an exact idea of the meals needing to be catered for, eliminating the element of waste.

 

As mentioned by Key Support, without software such as ami’s pre-ordering options, waste is one of the biggest things driving high school catering costs. Schools can’t refrigerate and reheat food once cooked. Instead, schools end up throwing away any uneaten cooked food.

 

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Marcus Orlovsky, a Tedx host on education and real estate, believes that one way to address this problem is by taking a restaurant-inspired approach to catering. This approach means that food is only taken out of the refrigerator when needed, reducing the likelihood that excess cooked food will be thrown away and allowing schools to put those ingredients to use another day.

 

With the money and resources saved from using a pre-ordered school meal system, the school can invest in better, healthy, locally sourced food and ingredients, meaning better and more nutritious school meals for students and staff.

 

With ami’s cashless software, free school meal (FSM) anonymity is maintained through a standardised cashless catering system to pre-order and collect food. This anonymity reduces FSM stigma and allows these pupils to enjoy the same lunchtime experience as their peers. Only the head and the school bursar will know which pupils qualify for free school meals, meaning no roll-call, colour-coding or separate queues.

 

In an age where food wastage and sustainability in education is more important than ever, schools must be aware of their impact on the environment and look to ways to minimise wastage and consequently increase uptake. With existing pre-ordering software that eliminates unnecessary waste, such as ami’s Infinity product, now is the time for schools to adapt to the

technology.

 

Get in touch to learn more.

Education
Vegetables-in-a-basket
How technology reduces food wastage

With the newly renewed prevalence of the food wastage issue, it is becoming more apparent than ever that the education sector needs to do its part to reduce the environmental impact of its catering systems and promote sustainability in schools.

 

A report published by Wrap.Org discovered food wastage from both primary and secondary schools as a result of a multitude of issues, including:

  • The absence of ordering systems leading to kitchens over-catering for an unknown number of students
  • Students at the end of the queue not being able to receive their food of choice, causing them to choose a meal they did not want and later waste it
  • Pupils not knowing what meal options were available to them
  • Lack of flexibility and control over food combinations or menus

However, with the help of pre-ordering technology - which has seen an increase in demand in recent years - schools can crackdown on food wastage and make massive savings on their budgets with a tailored and streamlined pre-order system for pupils.

 

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Prioritise sustainability

Sustainability is now a vital factor in the fight for the future of our planet. With food wastage accounting for almost a quarter of all artificial greenhouse gases, reducing the number of meals in landfills is vital.

 

In fact, in an article published by Greener Kirkcaldy, it was said that “if food wastage were a country, it would be ranked third after the US and China in terms of greenhouse gas production.” With a pre-order app, school catering teams can know ahead of time which quantity of each meal option to produce before anyone ever steps foot into a queue - creating an immediate reduction in overall food wastage in schools.

 

We recently discussed on our blog how the wastage of meals costs schools over £250 million each year, meaning there is more reason than ever to implement pre-ordering into your education environment.

 

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How does pre-ordering reduce food wastage?

Pupils can order what they want before lunchtime, meaning a faster queuing system with the food already prepared. Therefore, over-catering is eliminated, with reduced contact with other students, which has renewed importance amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Pre-order apps are also highly customisable, meaning schools can alter every aspect of a meal or remove items to suit students' personal preferences. Customising lunch choices takes away unwanted ingredients pupils would otherwise waste, not to mention the benefits of data trend predictions that can prevent the ordering of unnecessary stock and advanced preparation.

 

Does pre-ordering sound like something that could benefit your school? Introduce pre-order technology as a seamless addition to your cashless catering system.

 

Learn more > https://www.amieducation.com/products-and-solutions

ami news
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ami Education 2020 Year in Review

As 2020 draws to a close, the ami team is taking a moment to reflect on the past twelve months and look back on some of the great things we've achieved this year, which we couldn't have done without your help.

 

This year, we've focused on providing helpful advice for our customers on safely reopening schools and have been creating exciting new developments to help schools worldwide offer pupils a safe, socially distanced lunchtime. We can't wait to share more information with you in the new year.

 

New product in development

Over the past year, the AMI team has worked on an exciting new development for secondary schools worldwide, offering pupils a contactless lunch experience. Stay tuned for the announcement very soon. Be the first to know >

 

pre-order

 

One-to-one training

To help you brush up on your knowledge of cashless catering, we ran FREE one-to-one meetings, training and demonstrations with our Operations Manager, Tony Reeves.

 

We've published 11 blogs

We launched our education blog back in April this year. Throughout 2020, we've been sharing content on various topics, from why pre-ordering software is crucial for schools to how schools can prioritise nutrition after lockdown.

 

Evolis Gold Reseller

We aim to provide our customers with the highest level of service, which is why we're proud to have been recognised as an Evolis Gold Reseller, ensuring we offer the utmost level of support and service to the Evolis community. Learn more >

 

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Customer service has been our priority

Providing excellent customer service is at the heart of what we do at ami, which is why in 2020, total time spent on the phone to our customers amounted to 13 days, whilst we ensured that customers waited no longer than 3 minutes to speak with our support team.

 

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As 2020 comes to an end, from the team at ami, we wish you a safe and happy Christmas and look forward to seeing what 2021 brings.

ami news
Conceptual-business-vision-strategy
AMI recognised as Evolis Accredited Gold Partner

A focus on customer satisfaction

At ami Education, customer satisfaction is at the heart of everything we do. That’s why we invest heavily in our product offering, training options and customer support to make sure that our users are getting the maximum benefits from their cashless system.

 

Evolis Accredited Gold Partner

As with any software licence, the combination of hardware should enhance and complement your usability. Ami Education is proud to partner with Evolis, extending our gold level partner status under the Evolis Red Program. Our continued partnership means our clients can purchase the best printer products that seamlessly integrate with our cashless systems, fully integrated solutions, and service confidently.

 

Evolis

 

What is an Evolis Accredited partner?

Together, we offer schools a complete end-to-end solution. As a GOLD level partner, there are many benefits to our customers, which include:

  • Guarantee product delivery promptly
  • Provide you with best-in-class commercial service, including product demonstrations with printers and software
  • Offer 1st level technical support through our service helpdesk

Tony Reeves, Head of Operations at ami Education, said:

 

“We are delighted to have renewed our partnership with Evolis for 2020 as a Gold level reseller under the RED PARTNER accreditation. Our continued partnership is an example of our dedication to offering our customers the highest level of sales service and support.”

Education
Healthy eating concept with fresh veggies
Healthy Eating Week 2020: why nutrition must be a priority in schools after lockdown

In recent few weeks, stories of how schools have managed to reopen to all pupils safely have dominated education news outlets, with discussions on how most of these pupils have been eager to return to school, excited at the prospect of returning to a regular learning routine.

 

Whilst classroom learning is a crucial aspect of this routine; it is essential to consider how a positive lunchtime experience affects a student's learning ability. As today marks the start of the British Nutrition Foundation's Healthy Eating Week, we're looking at why nutrition must be a key priority for schools as the start of a new style of learning begins.

 

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Importance of school meals during lockdown

When schools closed in March, this brought a period of unrest and disruption to the routine of many, especially to younger children who were still getting used to the regular school routine and the benefits that it brought.

 

Providing pupils, especially those eligible for free school meals and whose parents/guardians were made redundant, with a regular supply of nutritious meals was crucial for education professionals. It highlighted the fantastic work done within the sector.

 

One example of this was the tireless effort put in by headteacher Zane Powles to hand-deliver 7,500 free school meals to his students in Grimsby. Another prominent case of the fight to provide children with free school meals was by footballer Marcus Rashford. He successfully called for the government to reverse a decision not to provide free school meal vouchers during the summer.

 

Zane

 

Those admirable efforts to help struggling families during lockdown show the importance of school meals and how schools can provide a vital service in keeping pupils well-fed with delicious and nutritious meals.

 

According to the National Food Strategy, the crisis of child food poverty is only growing, with up to 1.5 million more children in England eligible for free school meals. Therefore, when many pupils rely on their free school meal as their main meal of the day, especially after months when pupils may have experienced limited access to healthy food, this heightens the need to provide pupils with nutritious food during lunchtime.

 

While many factors affect a child's learning ability, providing them with a healthy lunch after months of uncertainty will be crucial to make up for time lost in the classroom.

 

Government regulations

Government regulations state that food served in schools and academies in England must meet standards that require the provision of good-quality meat, poultry or oily fish, fruit and vegetables, bread and other cereals and potatoes.

 

Drinks with added sugar and crisps, chocolate or sweets are banned in school meals and vending machines, as well as a limit of no more than two portions of deep-fried, battered, or breaded food a week. These regulations ensure that all the main food groups are covered, providing pupils with healthy food to keep their energy levels up and equip them with the tools to learn.

 

The new school lunchtime experience

Since schools reopened, the lunchtime experience differs by each school, with some schools operating on a 'packed lunch' only basis. Whether the school or parents provide lunches, other schools opt for pupils to each lunch in the classroom, and other schools offer pre-order services from the canteen, ensuring pupils can still safely access hot school meals.

 

Pre-order software, including AMI's Transact offering, allows pupils to pre-order their lunches ahead of time, reducing the need for queueing in the dining hall and therefore ensuring social distancing measures are abided. Pre-ordering software is becoming increasingly popular amongst schools across the UK. It is a vital drive in keeping children well-fed at lunchtime during the new age of social distancing rules in schools.

 

Transact

 

Value of hot school meals

Vital government regulations over the content of school meals mean that each pupil eating a hot school meal has access to at least one nutritionally adequate meal during the day, including those eligible for free school meals. On the other hand, packed lunches do not need to abide by these regulations, with research finding that only 2% of packed lunches meet school food standards (Evans et al. 2020).

 

Some may argue that packed lunches can be nutritionally balanced, like hot school meals. However, due to the lack of regulations over the content of lunchboxes, focusing on hot school meals is the most effective way of ensuring schools meet all the necessary dietary requirements for children and offer a safer option for pupils suffering from food allergies.

 

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"Serving a hot, nutritious daily meal to pupils would mean that parents, schools, and their caterers would have more faith knowing that children are getting the food that they need.

 

For many vulnerable children, their hot school meal is the only meal they have in the day. A more straightforward (and healthier) food offer would go a long way to ensure pupils eat food that meets the mandated school meal standards rather than being lured away by the daily temptation of their favourite food. " Jeanette Orrey, co-founder of Food for Life.

 

As we mark the beginning of Healthy Eating Week, putting hot school meals on the menu during school lunchtimes will be a key driver in providing pupils with consistent, nutritious food as they settle back into their new school routine. And judging by the increase in schools switching to cashless payments and a ‘grab and go’ style of lunch service, pre-ordering software will be the future of the Covid-19 friendly school lunchtime experience.

 

To learn more about how you can get involved in BNF Healthy Eating Week, visit: https://bit.ly/366CYBh.

 

How

Education
Three boys eating school lunch - resized
What school lunches look like around the world

School lunch options differ drastically by country. From four-course meals consisting of roast beef, tabbouleh and apple tart in France to spaghetti with seafood sauce and fish fillet au gratin in Italy, each nation offers unique meal choices for school pupils.

 

Children worldwide can access various foods to tuck into at lunchtime. At ami Education, we’re looking at what school lunches look like worldwide and how these differ by nutrition and variety.

 

United Kingdom

2000s

(Teaching Abroad)

 

Starting with the home country of AMI’s headquarters, UK’s school canteens have seen drastic changes to the food provided over the years, with a dramatic shift toward more nutritional food in recent years, thanks to Jamie Oliver’s Feed Me Better campaign in the noughties. Oliver’s campaign increased the standards of school meals and reduced saturated fat, sugar and salt present in the food served to children.

 

Current UK lunch options are far more varied, with an increased number of options for different dietary preferences. Research by the Children’s Food Trust shows that school meals in the UK are consistently more nutritious than packed lunches, providing children with a better foundation for good health.

 

Typical hot school lunches include vegetarian lasagne, pasta bake, fresh salads, jam roly-poly and more; healthy options with some old classics added.

 

France

France

(Sweetgreen)

 

Known for its culinary delights, France offers its pupils slightly more decadent options, including brie, steak, and apple tart, to name a few, whilst adhering to strict nutritional regulations concerning portion sizes, nutritional composition, and cooking methods.

 

For example, starters containing more than 15% fat can be served no more than 4 out of 20 days, which means that salads, grilled chicken with grains and even roast guinea fowl make regular appearances on French school menus.

 

Italy

 

School

(Sweetgreen)

 

As a nation with a healthier and perhaps more inclusive attitude toward food, it is no surprise that Italians focus on setting up children for healthy eating habits in adult life, and school lunches are the perfect way to promote healthy eating practices. Guidelines state that Italian school lunches must include a starchy dish such as rice or pasta, a main course such as meat, fish, cheese, two or more vegetable side dishes, and plenty of fruit.

 

Besides, Italian law is stricter regarding unhealthy food on school menus and forbids cafeterias from serving deep-fried food such as chips and fried chicken. Therefore, popular lunch items include minestrone, mushroom risotto, and the occasional scoop of gelato.

 

Greece

 

School

 

Unlike the other countries in this list, lunch is considered the main meal of the day in Greece, which means pupils often eat lunch at home or bring a packed lunch into school and therefore, many schools don’t offer subsidised school lunches. However, schools that serve lunch offer options including baked chicken with orzo, cucumber and tomato salad, stuffed vine leaves and yoghurt with fruit for dessert.

 

Sweden

 

School

(Casey Lehman)

 

Research shows that receiving free or reduced-price school lunches reduce food insecurity, obesity rates, and poor health. What sets Sweden apart from the other countries is that since 1997, all children can access a free hot school lunch, which consists of a hot meal, salad buffet, bread and a drink, with vegetarian options available.

 

Swedish schools do not serve desserts and soft drinks. In recent years, they have removed options such as pizza and deep-fried food, focusing on healthy and sustainable meal options such as meat or vegetable stew with potatoes, pasta with sauce, and knäckebröd, Sweden’s famous crispy bread.

 

Japan

 

School

(The Japan Guy)

 

Japanese nurseries and middle schools offer pupils school lunches. They are served in the classroom, emphasising nutrition education and teaching pupils how to cook healthy food from scratch and making students aware of the nutritional components of the food they’re eating.

 

Japan has one of the lowest obesity rates globally, which is likely a result of offering pupils food such as miso soup with pork, rice with grilled fish, milk, and dried fruit for dessert.

 

South Korea

 

School

(Sweetgreen)

 

South Korea is another country known for its healthy school lunch offerings and emphasises health education. Since pupils are encouraged to partake in various extracurricular activities after school, they need healthy lunch options to sustain them into the evening. Popular dishes include fried rice with tofu, kimchi, fish soup and mixed green vegetables.

 

America

 

School

 

Last but certainly not least, America is a country famous for its plethora of junk food offerings and fast food outlets on every corner. In US schools, the National School Lunch Programme provides low-cost or free school lunches to 31 million students at more than 100,000 schools per day, and meals must meet the nutritional standards based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

 

However, tight budgets and unhealthy school vendors have meant that lunches served in some US schools (but not all) are highly processed and lacking in fresh fruits and vegetables. These lunches often look like popcorn chicken with French fries, mashed potatoes, fruit cups, and chocolate chip cookies for dessert.

 

Resources for schools:

Education
High-school-students-wearing-uniform-in-cafeteria
Why pre-ordering meals is important for schools

What are the benefits of pre-ordered school meals?

Reports have found that food wastage costs schools over £250 million each year. Pre-ordering school meals reduces food wastage drastically and associated costs. This innovative software aims to reduce food wastage by providing school meal service providers with exact numbers of meal portions to prepare that day, eliminating the need for over-catering and ensuring children receive the meal they want.

 

Although school caterers generally have information on the number of pupils they are cooking for, they have no information about the specific numbers for each meal option in most schools. Although they are skilled at estimating how many children will choose each meal, they have no way of knowing the exact numbers, and this lack of information can result in food wastage.

 

What are the benefits of pre-ordered school meals to students and parents?

With a system that allows pre-ordered school meals, children and parents can choose their preferred meal option meaning not only reduced wastage but better food education, encouragement of healthy food options and increased parental engagement.

 

According to BUPA, the UK has one of the highest rates of childhood obesity in Europe, with 1 in 10 children aged 4 to 5 classified as obese and around 1 in 5 children aged 10 to 11. Pre-ordering meal software allows pupils to be actively involved in planning their meal choice and to take ownership of their diets.

 

Recent research has focused on how environmental changes and behavioural economics can guide children to make healthier choices to encourage students to select more nutritious foods. Pre-ordering school meals could pre-empt hunger-based, random selections and eliminate the sensory cues—evocative smells and sights—that lead to less healthy choices.

 

For a student, getting their meal choice, feeling comfortable with the process, not being rushed, and not having to wait in long queues are critical elements for schools adopting a pre-ordered approach to school meals.

 

There is also the benefit for children with food allergies and intolerances, as pupils can select a pre-ordered meal according to the necessary specifications.

 

Pre-ordering school meals also benefit students by reducing queueing at mealtimes. The lunchtime rush becomes a smoother experience with meals already ordered and paid for, as children simply have to collect their chosen meal from the cafeteria.
Reducing student meal queuing times further means a reduced percentage of pupils favouring out-of-the-gate spending, lowering the likelihood of excessive junk food consumption, leading to childhood obesity.

 

Pre-ordering is essentially pre-empting, and in today's society, using technology to plan ahead is the most efficient way to control an entity such as a school. Technology enables schools to pre-plan, taking the opportunity for human error and unnecessary time spent away and allowing better use of school resources.

Education
Group of diverse young pupils
Why do schools need queue management?

Transforming the lunchtime experience post-lockdown

One thing that is seemingly unavoidable in day to day life is queuing. Be it at the supermarket, post office or dry cleaners, waiting lines happen everywhere, anywhere and to anyone. Yet one place in which queues are in surplus and yet hugely unacknowledged or addressed is in schools. Despite sometimes being as disastrous as in retail, queuing in schools is rarely discussed.

 

The first contact with queuing in schools happens as students are trying to enrol and stretch their time in education to queue for mealtimes, school trips, registration and more. The biggest offender by far is the day to day slog of mealtime queuing in schools. Long waiting times matched with only a short period in which to eat makes lunchtime queuing something that needs to be addressed and improved for the benefit of staff and pupils.

 

The age-old custom of waiting in line wastes the average person up to two years of their life, according to a study by Casumo, and although saying goes 'time is money,' time is also time, something which students can't afford to waste. A student's priority is to study, and with a solid queue management system in place that follows strict social distancing rules, pupils can use the time saved for more essential school matters.

 

What are the results of poor queue management in schools?

A secondary school in London found this out the hard way, as its pupils were shunning food in a school canteen and instead were favouring the option to leave school grounds and purchase their lunches rather than queue for the school meals provided. This kind of 'out-of-gate' spending can mean students are consuming unhealthy foods for lunch, which the school cannot fully control. Unhealthy lunches are one of the main contributors to childhood obesity and poor nutrition in children.

 

close-up-of-teenage-girl-eating-hamburger-obesity--PXWZT96

 

Lengthy waiting times for lunch isn't an issue confined to smaller state schools either and arguably, somewhat worse than the out-of-gate junk food purchasing seen in London. In Neath, South Wales, pupils of a £40m Baglan Bay High School have waited throughout the entire lunch break and had to go back to class on an empty stomach.

 

What are the solutions for better queue management in schools?

Introducing cashless catering software such as AMI's Transact meal ordering and registration for primary schools is revolutionary in cutting school lunch wait times. Allowing pupils to pre-order their lunch choices via an interactive whiteboard or the teacher's PC enables younger pupils to select their food in a fun and interactive way.

 

After placing the order, the pupil's lunch choice is sent to the kitchen to be prepared for when they arrive at the dining hall, reducing the need to queue whilst pupils make their lunch choices.

 

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Other solutions to reduce school queues include AMI's ID management system and contactless cards, enabling schools to reduce contact at lunch whilst ensuring pupils abide by new social distancing measures. This software offers real-time database sync from the MIS system, meaning there is no chance of mistakenly missing students, with all applications managed through one central database.

 

ID management software, including AMI's Identity Management solution, identifies students through their contactless cards to make payments, gain access to areas, reset passwords and much more, saving vast amounts of time and resources during the mealtime rush. Queue management software leads to more efficient waiting times, organisation, and simplified identity management.

 

By using a cashless catering system and ID management software, schools can generate reports to show what food has been ordered and keep track of food wastage at the click of a button. This functionality gives schools control over the content of their pupil's meals, benefits their budgets (by avoiding unnecessary spending) and allows them to be environmentally sensitive by not contributing to food wastage.

 

AMI

 

Whilst a more efficient waiting area layout partially solves queuing controversy in schools, which will improve as more schools place ordering and collection points around the school, the core problem lies in queue management. The solution, therefore, is to invest in a queue management system for schools.

 

It is not enough to say that schools need queue management to ensure their students eat correctly and on time. When social distancing and minimal contact are key, cashless software is crucial to protect pupils and reduce the risk of germs spreading as lockdown measures ease, and pupils return to school.

 

Visit here to learn more about AMI’s full range of cashless catering and Identity Management solutions.

Education
Kids in classroom
Reopening schools around the world

Schools: A global view

As schools begin to reopen globally, we look at the various measures countries are taking to safeguard their staff and pupils. 

  • In Denmark, primary schools opened their doors in the middle of April, with secondary schools following one month later. The classroom looks remarkably different, with desks stationed six feet apart, and parents are no longer allowed inside school buildings. Classes are held outside where possible, and communal areas such as playgrounds and school libraries are closed to ensure pupils adhere to social distancing guidelines. Schools have also installed handwashing stations outside the buildings, and students are encouraged to wash their hands every hour.
 
  • Germany has also begun to reopen schools, prioritising younger pupils and those pupils due to sit exams.
    Classrooms have been set up so that desks are two meters apart and display all vital signs and posters that encourage social distancing and hand washing. School leaders state that face masks will be encouraged but is not mandatory.
 

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"Children quite rightly want to return to their normal lives," said Mrs Merkel.

  • Similarly to Germany, pupils in Austria returned to school earlier this month. However, to ensure safe social distancing, schools in Austria are splitting their class sizes in half, which means that pupils will now be attending school 2.5 days a week to alternate the classroom space. 

  • In France, the education ministry has issued detailed instructions to schools to keep their premises clean and pupils safe. The document states that; children over the age of 11 need to wear masks, a class cannot exceed 15 children, there are no shared toys, and schools are to implement timed arrivals. However, parents are reluctant to send their children back to school even with these safety requirements.

Jean-Michel Blanquer, French Education Minister, said:

"It's impossible to say to a family that they are obliged to send their child

back if they don't want to, in this kind of context."

  •  Schools have re-opened in Asia, China, South Korea, Taiwan, Vietnam, and Japan. In Japan, Taiwan, and China, staff members take students' temperatures before entering school buildings. In Beijing, pupils must fill out a survey on an app that calculates a person's risk of infection. Some students were also given personal thermometers and must take their temperature twice a day.  

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  • In Israel, schools are beginning to open for elementary school pupils. However, like France, many parents initially chose to keep their children home. Second and third graders in Israel wear protective masks while in school, but not in the classroom. 

  • For New Zealand, the Ministry of Education said schools "can start a transition period from Thursday 14 May," allowing them to bring different year groups back gradually with "transition arrangements" for children "whose parents are anxious about their return to school". 
 
  • Schools in Sweden have remained open throughout. They have relied on social distancing and hygiene measures to reduce the spread of infection. School leaders in Sweden have followed similar advice to schools around the world, such as:
    - Keeping sick staff and students at home
    - Raising awareness of hand hygiene
    - Extra cleaning
    - Social distancing
    - Heading outside, where possible
    - Continually preparing for changes

 As the United Kingdom prepares to re-open schools over the next few months, with some schools in England preparing to return as early as June, we take a look at some of the guidance education professionals will be following:

1. Reducing the size of classes and keeping children in small groups

Class sizes must be limited to 15 pupils, particularly difficult for large secondary schools across the UK. Schools must utilise other spaces available to facilitate this. In some cases, teachers may move classrooms instead of pupils to help control traffic in communal school areas.


2. Staggered break and lunchtimes, as well as drop-offs and pick-ups

Staggering break times will give schools more control over high-traffic areas and adhere to social distancing guidelines.

 

3. Increasing the frequency of cleaning
As well as maintaining a high level of cleanliness in the school building with thorough and frequent sanitisation of any shared objects, education professionals will also encourage pupils to increase the number of times a day that they wash their hands.    

 

We're here to help the return to school process as easy as possible. Get in touch.

 

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Education
Stop wasting food
Stop Food Waste Day 2020

Reducing food wastage in schools

We’re all encouraged to adopt eco-friendly habits such as recycling, switching off lights when they’re not in use and taking shorter showers. But reducing food wastage could be one of the critical actions we can take to minimise our environmental impact.

 

On Stop Food Waste Day 2020, we’re looking at how schools and pupils can reduce food wastage to help protect the environment and save time and money.

 

Many adults are aware of the smaller measures they can take to help protect the environment. While these efforts should be encouraged, schools need to instil these habits from an early age and make pupils aware of their impact, especially when it comes to wasting food.

 

Whilst most schools teach pupils about ways to help save the environment, schools and caterers can put these lessons into practice every lunchtime by taking the appropriate measures to keep food wastage to a minimum.

 

Reduce food wastage with cashless catering software

Switching to cashless catering such as pre-ordering software is one of the most effective ways schools can minimise their environmental impact and reduce food wastage on a larger scale.

 

AMI’s range of pre-ordering software, including Transact, allows pupils of all ages to pre-order their school lunches, sending orders to the kitchen ahead of time to enable catering staff to prepare meals in advance. By informing staff of meal choices in advance, schools can avoid producing too much food and can focus on only preparing what is necessary.

 

Transact provides a fun and interactive solution for pupils to pre-order their meal selection during the morning registration process on a primary school level. Pupils can make their selection at a teacher’s PC or interactive whiteboard, sending orders to the kitchen in advance.

 

Giving younger pupils the option to choose their food in a fun and interactive way encourages them to take an interest in their food choices, increasing the likelihood of eating all their lunch and reducing the risk of food left on the plate.

 

transactImage

 

Pre-ordering school meals also helps reduce food waste by minimising queuing times. Allowing pupils to choose their favourite lunch options in advance ensures they have access to the food they enjoy, whilst reducing queuing times and giving students adequate time to enjoy their lunch. By improving the dining experience and making lunchtime enjoyable for all pupils, food wastage can be reduced and save schools time and money.

 

Where food is wasted in schools

Waste management experts WRAP found that in both primary and secondary schools, the kitchen and canteen areas produced most of the total food waste, representing food prepared and served but not eaten in the canteen.

 

In primary schools, the total produced in these two areas was 72%, with an equal split between the kitchen (36%) and canteen (36%), which can be reduced by implementing cashless catering software, benefitting staff and pupils.

 

The organisers of Stop Food Waste Day encourage everyone to pledge to reduce their food wastage and urge others to do the same. They have found that 33% of all food produced globally is lost or wasted every year, whilst 25% of global food waste could feed 795 million undernourished people in the world.

 

Food

 

How schools can help

Here are some other ways that schools can encourage pupils to reduce their food wastage:

  • Serve correct portion sizes- younger children don’t need big portions. Therefore, when given more significant quantities of food, they are likely to become too full and leave the majority on their plate, which can be avoided by serving portions appropriate to the child’s age. Encourage older pupils to eat smaller portions and only go back for seconds if they’re still hungry.
 
  • Encourage school dinners over packed lunches- a recent study by the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex found free school meals in schools to be a valuable weapon in the fight against childhood obesity, containing more nutrition than packed lunches. Giving pupils a range of choices for their lunch means they’re more likely to choose the food they enjoy, whilst schools can monitor the nutritional value of the options provided.
 
  • Encourage school dinners over packed lunches- a recent study by the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex has found that the provision of free school meals in schools is a valuable weapon in the fight against childhood obesity, with school meals providing more nutrition than packed lunches. If pupils are given a range of choices for their lunch, they’re more likely to choose the food they enjoy, whilst schools can monitor the nutritional value of the options provided.
 
  • Promote a calm eating environment- many pupils are likely to get excited about lunchtime. However, if the dining hall is noisy, this can cause an unpleasant eating environment for some pupils, prompting them to avoid spending time in the dining hall, leaving behind the food on their plates.
 
  • Make pupils aware of the issue- especially for older pupils; schools can demonstrate the impact of food wastage on their environment on a broader scale, similarly to Loughborough High, who launched a campaign after realising how much food was wasted. They started by measuring a week’s waste and then filling the equivalent of black bags (around 20) with paper and cards and putting them in the middle of the school hall, so pupils saw them when they arrived for assembly. The students were asked to come up with their ideas for reducing waste.
 

Visit Stop Food Waste Day’s website to learn more about the campaign. 

Education
Working from home
How to successfully work from home

Working from home within the education industry

With most of the world in lockdown due to COVID-19, including schools, many workers have to adapt to working from home, a new working style for professionals in the education industry. For education professionals, this unique working style can bring up various challenges, including how to continue as usual during these unusual working conditions.

 

We’ve put together our top tips for working from home to ensure working life continues, with simple points on keeping some normality during these unprecedented times.

 

Set goals (and stick to them)

With many schools shut and pupils at home, it’s still important to try and set achievable goals for yourself, staff and students. These can include catching up on admin work, setting reading tasks for pupils or simply communicating with parents; by setting achievable goals, you’ll add some structure and normality into your new routine. If you need any assistance on software maintenance, the staff at ami are happy to help.

 

Set up a comfortable working space

Those who are not used to working from home are unlikely to be blessed with impressive office spaces, but it’s vital to set up a separate area that you can dedicate to your work.

 

It’s easy to fall into the habit of bringing your laptop onto the sofa. However, spaces you use to relax should be reserved for just that purpose. Otherwise, switching off at the end of the day can be challenging. If possible, set up a dedicated working space, such as a dining room table, spare room or anywhere in your home with minimal disruption.

 

Establish a routine

Routines keep us focused and grounded, and since we’re creatures of habit, it’s essential to try and set and maintain structure each day to help ease the transition into home working. Try and maintain similar habits that you practised when working out of the home, such as morning exercise, waking up at the same time every day, making a healthy breakfast etc. Sticking to a routine will eventually help bring normality into your new working style.

 

Take regular breaks

When working in a school or education environment, taking regular breaks can often be challenging, especially if surrounded by pupils. It can be easy to stay at your desk for hours without realising the time, negatively affecting your back and eyesight when working from home. Whether you get up to make a drink, stretch or pet your dog, set yourself a reminder to take regular screen breaks; your dog will appreciate the extra belly rubs!

 

Ask for support

Despite the COVID-19 crisis, business at ami will continue as usual, and our staff are here to help. If you have any queries regarding our software, don’t hesitate to contact a member of our team. Remote working can lead to isolation for many people, but it’s important to remember that we’re all in this situation together. Therefore, we should support each other during these difficult times.

 

Plan-ahead

With the ever-changing nature of this pandemic and new developments emerging daily, there has been an emphasis on taking each day as it comes. However, when it comes to working, this can be the perfect opportunity to schedule some time to plan, including for when schools are likely to open.

 

Councils and staff can use this time to monitor food trends to see the types of food pupils have been ordering, helping to determine which areas to focus on for spending and allowing schools to reduce food wastage and save money. Food trend monitoring can be done through ami’s Infinity and Transact software, trusted by thousands of schools and councils across the UK.

 

Maintain regular communication

As professionals worldwide transition from office to home-based working, it is vital for individuals and teams to maintain regular communication, even when discussing non-work-related topics.


One of the benefits of working within an office or school is the opportunity to chat with colleagues, discuss weekend plans and build friendships. Even though face-to-face contact is now minimised, with modern technology, teams can continue that communication through tools such as Microsoft Teams, Zoom, House Party and more, helping to maintain that crucial social interaction.

 

COVID-19 has proved to be challenging for many professionals in the education sector. By practising these simple methods, adapting to this new working style can be seamless and straightforward. For help and support, please don’t hesitate to contact the team at aim.

Education
COVID-19
Customer Advice COVID-19

As schools face the many challenges caused by Coronavirus (COVID-19), we want to assure you that at AMI Education, we are closely monitoring the situation to ensure we can continue to support our customers.

 

We take our duty of care to our employees, customers and clients very seriously, and we will always follow the latest Government advice.

 

Advice to Schools

As a valued AMI Education customer, we appreciate the trust you put in us to ensure your systems continue to work seamlessly, so we have outlined our continuity plans below.

 

School Closures

If your school should need to close, we ask that your systems remain switched on and running. Keeping your systems running will allow our support team to carry out remote upgrades and work on outstanding cases, helping to reduce any issues and ensuring your return to school is as seamless as possible.

 

Ongoing Support

In the event of COVID-19 closing the AMI office, or employees working from home in isolation, staff will be working from home using their office equipment.

 

For sales, please ring: 08456 717 101 or email: sales@amieducation.com

For support please: 08450 714 667 or email: support@amieducation.com

As usual, these will be picked up by the support/sales team and dealt with.

 

We may have to postpone already arranged site visits, and there may be some delay in processing orders for parts. We encourage you to continue to place orders as usual, and we will update you on the expected timelines as the order progresses.

 

Staying Safe

As the coronavirus situation evolves, our thoughts go out to all affected. We hope you are safe and are taking all the necessary precautions.

Education
Students eating lunch 2
Taking cash out of schools

With automated payment methods and debit cards replacing traditional cash payments, it is becoming more common within businesses industries, and now, most recently, schools are switching to cashless. Figures from the Payments Council published on Education Business reveal that cashless payments overtook traditional cash payments in 2014 for the first time.

 

What are the benefits to schools going cashless?

There are many benefits of switching to cashless systems, one of which affects a school's budget and resources. Offering parents the ability to review their expenses and top-up their child's online account is a great way to boost a school's income and spending per pupil.

 

Although small payments such as those regularly made by parents for school meals, uniforms and educational trips contribute considerably to the overall school income, they can also create a market deficit when they go unpaid. 'Dinner money debt' is now a serious concern for schools, with one council in Wales recently revealing a debt of over £130,000 aggregated over five years. A cashless system diminishes the potential for unpaid fees.

 

Furthermore, taking cash out of schools benefits budgets by saving the hefty cost of the physical collection of money to deposit at a bank. Ami's cashless software generates daily, weekly or monthly reports with ease, providing access to information on meals consumed, overdue accounts and food wastage, all of which contribute to lowering costs and reduced administration time.

 

As for the benefit of a school's resources, cashless catering systems free up a considerable amount of time for the administration staff. Taking cash out of schools can cut down the tiresome task of physically collecting and chasing cash payments from pupils and parents via mail and telephone.

 

Software such as AMI's Infinity and Transact frees up these essential resources for use in other ways. Administration staff can easily monitor payments, view historical purchases, and make audit trailing a lot more efficient. Using cashless software, schools in the UK have saved on average two and a half days of administration time a month.

   

AMI

 

How do cashless schools benefit parents and students?

Taking cash out of the school system is not only time saving, but it gives parents the peace of mind that pupils spend money in the way as intended with online payments. Pre-paid school meals mean parents know that children use lunch money for healthy, nutritious meals.

 

Additionally, parents no longer need to send cash or cheques for circumstances such as school trips or extra-curricular activities. Ninety per cent of parents stated that they preferred to pay online, according to a survey from LACA.

 

Ami's cashless catering solutions also increase parent convenience and control. They are accessible from any location with an internet connection, optimising parents' increasing access to computers and hand-held devices. Almost one in 10 public school pupils are from overseas, so this level of access is beneficial for those families.

 

What are the benefits of removing physical cash from schools?

Removing physical cash from schools allows for increased student safety. Adopting a cashless system prevents age-old issues such as bullying, lunch money theft and potential misplacement or loss and eliminates any money safety issues. Students also no longer need to worry about forgetting to take cash to school and missing out on meals, as they are already pre-ordered and paid.

 

How can going cashless make a school more efficient?

Ami's cashless catering software is flexible and works around each school's requirements. During lunchtimes, for example, cashless software systems provide significant time-saving benefits such as reducing queues. Schools can cut down lengthy waiting times for their students and staff through quick and straightforward identification methods such as PINs, pre-order kiosks and more.

 

Pre-ordering meals in advance greatly minimise food wastage. Ami's software allows school meal service providers to know exactly how many portions of each meal option to prepare that day, eliminating over-catering and ensuring children receive the meal that they want.

 

What benefits does a cashless system have on a social level?

Cashless catering software removes any potential discrimination of students by providing ‘Free School Meals’ (FSM) anonymity. A recent LACA survey revealed that 4.9 per cent of pupils entitled to a free meal do not take up their entitlement. The stigma of FSM is still very much apparent in schools, yet with a cashless system, all students have the same method of payment option, regardless of their circumstances.

 

Cashless systems have also proven to promote healthy eating, encouraging pupils to eat the nutritious meals provided, which is exceedingly essential when tackling the childhood obesity crisis and leading to a better learning environment. Mealtime pre-ordering encourages parent engagement and allows parents to control what their children consume when they are not with them.